Noise Intercepted Collaborators

Salomeh A - Program facilitator

sahmadi

Toronto, Canada

Why do I want to participate?

I am an arts facilitator (mixed medium, acrylic, photography and wet darkroom) and usually implement and motivate others to create. I want to get back into communicating through art for myself through these prompts. The project sounds exciting as I love the concept of working within a self-directed framework along with a process in reflecting, which I think is important. Also the idea of collective voices approaching the same tasks in multiple ways in multiple cities is art in itself and it will be exciting to see the interpretations of the work that is produced.

 

Posts:

It may be a matter of breathing life into something overlookedNoise Challenge #2: The Little Things

We can think about how we ourselves feel when we take things for granted. What do we neglect to listen to? How are we simultaneously connected to the most spontaneous layers of ourselves in relation to the noises around us? What do those noises, whether functional, metaphysical, spiritual, ontological or emotional, activate in us? In opening ourselves we may activate realms of our inner city spaces to those outer ones that are repetitive, detailed, colourful and that both protect us and make us vulnerable to  the kind and unkind energies of our environments.

How do we connect to aspects of our being through the insignificant sounds and signs and transform them and reconnect with aspects of our being that have been forcefully suppressed? If we trust that the spaces around us and our interactions with them have the power to reciprocally reanimate segments of our interiors that feel dead, frozen, confused, vulnerable, phony, painful or lost, then perhaps we can allow ourselves to feel the colourful beauty in a more clear-sighted manner. This will allow us to discern dimensions of noises we normally overlook.

PassageNoise Challenge #1: The Pulse


While the passage of time and person doesn’t mean much these days it does mean a lot in terms of outcome. How much do I pay attention to my surroundings? How and in what ways do I fill space? How much does my world view change as I shift and sift from place to place via public transportation? How much does it mean to smile to a stranger? To say hi? To say please and thank you even when I’m  having the shittiest day? Do I ignore more than I am attentive? What should I pay attention to? Have I become a product of soundbites and incomplete sentences? Or am I, along with you, reproducing and replicating ourselves as such? What would it mean to pay any more or less attention to the mundane? Could we not make the mundane somehow more profound through exercises like these?

I think we just did.

-Salomeh